Q'eros

Story

The Q’eros


The Q’eros people are known as the wisdom keepers of the Andes. They are organic potato farmers, alpaca herders, musicians and weavers who live in remote villages at 14,500 feet. Considered to be the last Incans of Peru, the Q’eros strive to preserve their indigenous ethnic identity. They are one of the most isolated Andean communities, moving with the seasons to live and work at various altitudes. The Q’eros are known for the beauty of their traditional weavings which are encoded with ancestral symbols and earth-centric cultural knowledge. The Q’eros people live a hardworking life at one with nature. They perform offerings to Pacha Mama, Mother Earth, and to the Apus, mountain spirits, in exchange for their well being and that of their animals and crops. Worldview concepts of ayni, the importance of reciprocal sharing, and animu, awareness of an animated essence in all things, shape their interactions with each other and their environment. 

 

Our Project 

 

We are creating and building a museum and centre for the preservation of Q’eros culture – in Q’eros. Q’eros men and women will help curate, archive and exhibit photographs, videos, books, oral histories, musical recordings and instruments, clothing, textiles, botanicals, artefacts and more unique to their community. We expect the centre to be a platform for research and educational programming. It will be a repository and resource where students, visitors and scholars can come to a deep understanding of how this people adapted to extreme environmental challenges, something our entire planet is now facing, through cooperation and reverence. The Q’eros feel an obligation to share their teachings at this time. Our goal is to conserve, propagate and celebrate their legacy of care and respect for each other and mother earth.

 

 

Q'eros are said to be the ultimo ayllu Inca, the last Inca community in the country.

They are also one the most isolated Andean communities.

They are known outside the area for their traditional weaving techniques

The dyed yarn from alpacas, sheep and llamas, is used to weave images into fabric.

Each Quechua sub-group has its own, specific, identifying weaving style. One of our goals is to document this tradition.

The despacho ceremony refers to the burning of offerings to send messages to the spirits

Q'eros

Story

The Q’eros


The Q’eros people are known as the wisdom keepers of the Andes. They are organic potato farmers, alpaca herders, musicians and weavers who live in remote villages at 14,500 feet. Considered to be the last Incans of Peru, the Q’eros strive to preserve their indigenous ethnic identity. They are one of the most isolated Andean communities, moving with the seasons to live and work at various altitudes. The Q’eros are known for the beauty of their traditional weavings which are encoded with ancestral symbols and earth-centric cultural knowledge. The Q’eros people live a hardworking life at one with nature. They perform offerings to Pacha Mama, Mother Earth, and to the Apus, mountain spirits, in exchange for their well being and that of their animals and crops. Worldview concepts of ayni, the importance of reciprocal sharing, and animu, awareness of an animated essence in all things, shape their interactions with each other and their environment. 

 

Our Project 

 

We are creating and building a museum and centre for the preservation of Q’eros culture – in Q’eros. Q’eros men and women will help curate, archive and exhibit photographs, videos, books, oral histories, musical recordings and instruments, clothing, textiles, botanicals, artefacts and more unique to their community. We expect the centre to be a platform for research and educational programming. It will be a repository and resource where students, visitors and scholars can come to a deep understanding of how this people adapted to extreme environmental challenges, something our entire planet is now facing, through cooperation and reverence. The Q’eros feel an obligation to share their teachings at this time. Our goal is to conserve, propagate and celebrate their legacy of care and respect for each other and mother earth.

 

 

Q'eros are said to be the ultimo ayllu Inca, the last Inca community in the country.

They are also one the most isolated Andean communities.

They are known outside the area for their traditional weaving techniques

The dyed yarn from alpacas, sheep and llamas, is used to weave images into fabric.

Each Quechua sub-group has its own, specific, identifying weaving style. One of our goals is to document this tradition.

The despacho ceremony refers to the burning of offerings to send messages to the spirits

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Subscribe to the mailing list to keep up with updates from the Jimmy Nelson Foundation. And don’t worry... we don’t like spam either